Category Archives: garden

“Sublime or Ridiculous?”

September has been a busy, interesting month with another week in Bristol, a day at the seaside, visits to a garden exhibition and a beautifully restored National Trust House plus seeing two movies.  On top: lunches with friends, book club, yoga and singing, also your support, all helpful positive things to relieve some of the fatigue which is improving slowly. I keep telling you all how lucky I feel, not complacently I hope.

Sublime may seem a strange heading for a blog but it has different meanings, my use refers to art, architecture and inspiring achievements. Ridiculous is obvious although as you will see it held a few surprises! My first example was an exhibition of sculpture in a local National Trust garden.  I shared an exhibition set here with you last year of stained glass flower sculptures but this time was very different.  Several of the metal pieces were awesome and delicate, others were ridiculous. The setting enhanced the work too. I could not find what technique the artist used to create the sculptures  and ran out of time sorry. I hope you enjoy the images I’ve included.

My week in Bristol was based in a different part of the city, more multicultural and I met some fascinating characters on my journeys into the centre by bus.  As I mentioned last time I love Bristol,  the highlight was visiting St. Nicholas Market with my grandchildren and all eating different street food from various countries then sharing them. Memories of the day remain and I cherish them.

I visited Clevedon with a friend to photograph the pier which was a feat of Victorian Engineering. Boats still pick up from the pier to take visitors along the North Somerset Coast, a trip I am determined to make. The houses epitomise the wealth of past eras, some from trade in Bristol and people becoming upwardly mobile. Sunshine made the day more enjoyable with the reflections from the water and feel good factor.  I hope the photos help you to capture the beauty of Clevedon Pier.

We moved on to Tyntesfield, a Victorian country house and estate lived in and expanded by four generations.  I originally visited 10 years ago and the changes were amazing.  The interior of the house reflected the Victorian interests in art, technology and innovation.  Many original pieces of furniture remain all beautifully restored by National Trust experts and volunteers. Unfortunately, we ran out of time to visit the gardens but did pop into the Church which was a history lesson itself. Two photos give a glimpse if you are ever in this part of the world. Tyntesfield would be on my sublime list.

Finally, the ridiculous. By chance on our wanderings with my son and family we came upon an exhibition in the Centrespace Gallery which houses temporary exhibitions. Umbrella Covers were the subject of this fascinating exhibit. Nancy 3 Hoffman Director and Curator of the Umbrella Cover Museum hosted our visit.  Nancy 3 is the current Guiness World Record Holder for Umbrella Covers.  Her home and museum are on Peaks Island, off the coast of Maine. A true eccentric and enthusiast, not as ridiculous as we initially thought. Nancy 3 played her accordion and we joined her in singing the Umbrella Song.  My grandsons were fascinated. We all had great fun, do check out Nancy 3’s website.

The Movies were Dunkirk and Victoria and Abdul, very different but both thought provoking. Quite a month!

 

 

http://www.umbrellacovermuseum.org

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An Apology

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My apologies, everyone, I am unable to do my blogspot today due to several domestic problems in the Domino household. Nothing to worry about and normal service shall be resumed as soon as possible. Meanwhile, for your enjoyment, here are … Continue reading

Everything in Threes

Why does everything seem to come in threes? Is it magic number? We have the Three Stooges; plants should be grouped in threes; the Holy Trinity; the three wise men, traffic lights – red, amber, green; clothes, especially for babies: one on, one off and one in the wash; pre-packed meat in supermarkets, chops always seem to be in threes, not one or two or even four; three primary colours: red, blue and yellow; the three little pigs; three blind mice; no buses for an hour then three come along at once; three teaspoonsful equal one tablespoon… I could go on but it does seem odd (excuse the pun) that life and nature frequently have this triplet number. I’ve often wondered why or if there is any significance. Are these things simply a pattern? A lucky number, perhaps? No, I don’t think so for trouble always seems to come in threes too? At least it does in my house. I’ll elaborate…

Dave’s been retired now a month. It’s been brilliant. We’ve had a lot of fun, more laughs than I can remember us having and he and I have enjoyed every moment of this new phase in our long marriage. Except this month has also brought unwelcome and unexpected expense. Picture the scene: a beautiful Sunday, guests joining us for lunch, a roast merrily cooking its way, then bang! All the power in the house goes down. Trip switch flicked on again and again. Bang! Yes, you’ve guessed it, the cooker decided to burn out one of the heating elements in the oven. Oven turned off, meal resumed in the jet stream and microwave. Engineer summoned Monday morning. New element ordered, fitted on Wednesday.

Thursday, pouring with rain. Never mind, have washing to do. Thank goodness for tumble drier as we don’t have room for a washing line in the garden. Load machine with sheets. Drum turns a few times as it fills with cold water. Then bang! Trip switch shuts power off. Dave blames pump in koi pond and goes off to sort. I turn washing machine back on. Off power goes again. Kicks machine. Okay, it’s nearly 14 years old, never broken down so I can’t complain. Suspect pump has given up. Removes wet, soaking bedding from drum. Scratches head. What to do with dripping washing. Engineer summoned again in hope he can fix it. Yes he can. Heater element blown. New one ordered and fitted following Monday morning.

Now have larger washing mountain to climb. First load in: several large towels. Washing machine works a treat and an hour later they are dying in tumble drier. Well… I thought they were. All lights flashing on machine, washing still damp after two hours. Drier defunct. Research problem on internet: Common fault. Terminal. Still pouring with rain so can’t even rig up temporary line. New tumbler on order for next day delivery.

So, that is our three bad things done. Hopefully. Please no more. Dave reckons the dishwasher will be next as it’s over 10 years old. I’ve told him if it does break down, he will be doing all the washing up for wishing it upon us.

It’s still raining, and blowing a gale, but at least the garden is thriving, even if we can’t get out there and enjoy it today.

Kit’s Website and Blog  and Kit’s Art  Site

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Plus’s and Minus’s

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They say there plus’s and minus’s to almost everything and this year that’s been the case with the weather here in the Pacific NW.  I’ve lived in this area most of my life and I can only remember one year … Continue reading

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May- Flowers, Road Trip and Two Maydays

This gallery contains 5 photos.

Jillian here and I’m going to talk about traveling as well.  Seems a lot of us are on the go these days! The end of May, we took a road trip up to Williamsburg, Virginia. My son and his wife … Continue reading

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Enjoying Life

This gallery contains 4 photos.

So, June already! And to think it’s only another three weeks before the nights start getting longer again. What a thought. What a horrible thought. It’s been a busy month and yet nothing much has been going on apart from … Continue reading

Held In Suspension

March has slipped into April already (how did that happen so quickly?) and spring has well and truly arrived. A few April showers and a lovely weekend gladdens the heart, raising the spirit. It’s been a glorious time for spring bulbs and flowers, the forsythia hedge at its best. I love this hedge at this time of year but during winter it’s bare, boring once leaves have been shed in autumn. At least for the rest of summer it’s a bright green. It’s been a fabulous season too for hyacinths and daffodils and primulas and now the tulips are out along with the sweet-scented wallflowers.

Now all this profusion of colour should be making the Domino household happy but since the new year, we’re living as if in suspended animation, with our breaths held, waiting … waiting. You see, last summer my husband was diagnosed with circulatory problems in his leg and the suggestion made he needed a stent fitted: a simple op under local anaesthetic as a day patient. He had an MRI scan in July, and there the story came to an abrupt halt. We assumed he was on the waiting list and, not being urgent, his time would come around in due course. So we waited… and waited…

Just after Christmas, our GP rang to ask what was happening – Had Dave been for his scan? What was the outcome? – because our GP hadn’t been informed by the hospital. I told him we’d heard nothing, not even if he was on the waiting list. Our GP said he would chase the consultant and find out the situation. More waiting… At the end of February, we were advised the op was scheduled for 17th March. Two days before this, a phone call revealed it had been put back to 28th and he would be under a different consultant surgeon. And so more waiting…

Meanwhile, we tried to carry on as normal, although Dave found it hard, he now has difficulty walking and his job involves a lot of it. On 26th March, a further call advised the op was put back yet again to 4th April. Oh boy! This was not good. Neither of us could focus on anything much. Always waiting for the postman. Hoping the telephone wouldn’t ring with a further delay. Waiting… dreading… waiting…

Last week, we had a long meeting with the surgeon, who explained for the first time what the op entailed, why the delay and why he had taken over Dave’s case. This was a good meeting because up until that point we had no real idea of what was involved: a long 4-hour two-part major surgical procedure under general anaesthetic, far more complicated than just a stent fitted. At least we knew the good outcomes now and what could go wrong. Worrying.

And yes, more waiting… but this time it was good waiting time. It enabled Dave to get a lot of planting done, potatoes, broad beans, onions in along with some summer bulbs. It also meant he could join the family in celebrating my mother’s 91st birthday last Sunday, especially too as my brother was over from Spain as a surprise for her again. It was. And a lovely day had by all, sadly no photos this time.

The 4th is tomorrow. I have to take Dave to hospital at 7 am. He will be in for several days followed by at least 6 weeks at home recuperating. So you can understand why we feel life has been on hold these past few months. At least we’re there now, we hope. Our only fear is that even though  he’s first on the list for the day, should a bigger emergency take precedence, he may be put back yet again.

The waiting’s almost over, but not quite. But then afterwards, at least we will slowly be able to get our lives back to normal, breathe a sigh of relief and enjoy the summer.