Author Archives: Kit Domino

Paint and Snow

Apologies for being a little late with this month’s post. I blame Word 2010. It’s been playing up, crashing for no reason, changing fonts without my blessing and goodness knows what other mischief. It seems I’m not the only one either, from what I’ve gleaned on the internet. I was just about to load my post when it crashed again, so I gave up. Never mind. I’m here now.

What a busy month January turned out for me. If someone had told me a little over 12 years ago when I began painting that I would find myself being an art tutor, I would never have believed them. Likewise, when I accepted the opportunity to teach acrylic painting to a group in my art club, I never expected how much of my time it would take. Who would have thought teaching for 2 hours every Friday afternoon for 4 weeks would take over my life entirely.

I had no idea of the abilities of those attending, and without this information, I had to structure the sessions to fit all comers.  I found out at the first session at least six had never painted before. Others were already members of the art group, but had either never used acrylics or had tried them without success. What was I going to say? What would we paint? Could I paint a half-decent picture in front of an audience? Did I know enough to fill up 8 hours.

I made copious notes, and wrote my opening dialogue out several times, so it at least sounded as if I knew what I was talking about. I then played it back using TextAloud, to check I didn’t waffle on for too long and to make sure it made sense. I had several sleepless nights pondering on everything. Worrying, not that I couldn’t pull it off, but whether my nerves and my voice would hold out. It goes croaky and quiet if I talk too much.

I need not have worried. I had a full class: 20 people. More than anticipated but I didn’t have time to give as much individual attention as I had planned to. We had laughs, we had questions, we had fun, and they came back the following week, so I must have been doing something right. But again, I spent hours working on my notes and dialogue and order of the day. And I didn’t mess up once. My thanks in all this go to my writing group (the Ivy Writers) who, over the years, have given me the confidence to read my work out aloud. A nervous, shaking wreck the first time I had to read out anything; now I have no problems doing so. It all comes with practice. A bit like painting, as I told my acrylic beginners.

The third week arrived and painting continued, but I realised I had chosen a too ambitious a painting for my class. I should have picked a much simpler piece, for them and for me. It’s not easy standing at an easel because I always sit when I’m painting. I had to paint large too, so those at the back could see, and I had to work almost sideways at the easel. If I stood in front they wouldn’t have seen anything. Another week working on my final notes, closing dialogue etc. It was all I could think about all week.

The fourth and final day dawned, heralded by 5 inches of snow, roads blocked, schools closed, as was the venue we use. Disappointment all round. I had hoped to have a photo of my entire group. Pictures of the paintings they produced, and some feedback on the entire course. At this point in time, I do not know if we can rearrange to this Friday.

I’ve enjoyed it all. Learned a lot myself. Gained confidence. Made new friends in the art group. My notes haven’t gone to waste. The art group has asked me to run the course again later this year. I will know what I’m doing. I won’t have to spend weeks working on my lessons. I have time to find a simple painting for them to work from. I know what to leave out, what to emphasise.  And out of the snow day, a new painting is emerging. Watch this space!

Kit’s Website and BlogKit’s Kitchen,  Kit’s Art  Site

A New Year Begins

A Happy New Year!

It can’t be 2019 already, can it? Where’s the last one gone? Gone far too quick, that’s for sure. Seems like only yesterday I was saying a Happy New Year 2018 to you all. I hope you’ve all enjoyed the recent festivities. Ours was quiet, just as we like it, with my mother, Dave and I together over the period. This year, for a change we opted for a traditional Christmas dinner of turkey, including sprouts, followed by Christmas pudding, something Dave would never eat once upon a time. Now he asks for it and is hoping when we next go shopping the store will have some left. He even enjoyed the mince pies,  Lebkucken biscuits and Stollen –things he’s always turned his nose up to before. He’s also ventured into the pleasure of eating yoghurt, and curries. (Okay, who is this man and what have you done with the real Dave?)

Mother enjoying a quiet moment.

Boxing Day was made even more enjoyable by a surprise visit from our daughter and two grandchildren. My mother, their great-grandmother, was delighted to see them as she doesn’t have much opportunity to nowadays. I often think the term “grandchildren” sounds wrong for adult grandkids. There needs to be a better one. Any suggestions?

As Dave packs away the Christmas tree and decorations into the loft, I have a quiet moment to look back on 2018 in the Domino household. It’s certainly been a busy year, one with many ups and frequent let downs, highlights and disappointments, and worry over the health of one of my sisters, who thankfully is now okay. And a sad one too, with the loss of two family members, but made up for by a new little member to the clan, which I’ve yet to meet. We endured a freezing spring with the Beast from the East, made up for by a gloriously hot summer to remember. And it was a year that saw a milestone for us with our 40th wedding anniversary, not that we celebrated; we never do.

It’s also been an expensive year as we’ve revamped and restocked the garden and the dining/living room, and had to unexpectedly change what was meant to be our car for life. This was thanks to a design fault in the sunroof which let in water when it rained, destroying all the electrics. And having paid out previously for a costly repair which didn’t work, the car had to go. We are thrilled with our serendipitous replacement, so it turned out good in the end.

Back in May, I enjoyed a successful art exhibition which led to a few sales and a request to teach an art class, which starts next week for 4 sessions. I’m feeling quite chuffed although a little daunted and nervous at the prospect.  The response for a place was so overwhelming, I’ve already been asked to run another later in 2019.

I missed having a holiday abroad, but fully intend to make up for it this year by having two (or more if I can!), and maybe I can finally get Dave abroad again.

So what else does this year hold in store for me? Teaching more art classes, perhaps? I will if the opportunity arises. And I must, must, must, stop dithering and wasting time on social media and other things when I should be writing. I’ve no excuse, but as we all know, it’s so easy to let it slip. And with at least four books either finished, nearly finished or even half-way finished, I need to knuckle down. That’s where the disappointments came last year. Too many rejections. But I shall not give up. I mean, what else am I supposed to do whilst it’s cold, and he’s downstairs watching cricket, and rugby, and American football? No, no excuses at all.

And what of your year? Whatever you have planned I wish you one of good health and harmony and success in whatever you do to make it a VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR indeed.

Kit’s Website and Blog, Kit’s Kitchen,  Kit’s Art  Site

The Grand Reveal

Drum roll, please. For today is the day I can finally unveil the new lounge and dining room. Yes, we’ve finished! Well, almost. We’re waiting on new patio doors to the rear and then we can buy new blinds but until then, it is with great relief we are back to normal and sitting comfortably.

Although it doesn’t show in the photos, the chimney breast has sparkles in the paint; not a great deal but enough for our liking, as has the wallpaper. The rest of the walls are plain pale grey. I admit I was dubious of the colour at first, as it is such a marked changed from our usual taste and I thought it would look cold. It doesn’t. Dave was worried in case the wooden floor would be cold too as opposed to carpet on our concrete floors, but again, it feels warm to walk on, and I quite often find him walking around in bare feet.

He’s worked incredibly hard. He’s done everything with the exception of the plastering and hanging the wallpaper either side of the chimney breast – that was my job as he’s never hung a strip of paper in his life. And I have to say for what are two small walls with no sockets or fiddly bits to cut around, it was the most expensive paper I’ve hung and the most difficult. An absolute nightmare. And never again am I ever hanging another strip. Dave knocked down the tired and space-filling stone fireplace, allowing me to take the first swipe with the sledgehammer, he’s done all the painting, laid the flooring throughout and fitted new skirting boards as well as humping and retrieving our furniture from storage, with the help of a man with a van. It’s such a joy to be able to sit in our own chairs once more. We’d really had enough of sitting on stiff, unforgiving garden chairs.

The photos don’t really do the rooms justice, particularly today when it’s cold and wet outside so the lighting inside isn’t very good. I did turn on our new overhead lights to take them, but they were too bright so I hope you get the idea.

So now to relax and enjoy Christmas. And taking this opportunity to wish you all a safe, happy and fun-filled time.

Gallery

This gallery contains 3 photos.

And in blows November. Chilly winds, dark mornings, dark earlier of an evening. And frosts. Here in my little part of the UK we’ve had several hard frosts. The garden survived the first few, but succumbed to the last one. … Continue reading

Busy Doing Nothing – Not

Well, here we are in October and so far in the UK it’s been mild and colourful. The leaves began changing colour earlier than normal, but that was in part due to the hot dry summer we’ve all enjoyed. Although the past month has been hectic for us, in truth it feels like very little has been achieved.

September began with a week’s stay by my mother who always feels she’s in the way and stopping us from doing things. More so this time, as she knew we were about to embark on the major redecoration of our lounge and dining room. She wasn’t, as we had no intention of starting until the weather was cool enough for Dave to work in and we had various arrangements to put in place. On top of this was added expense of having to change our car due a particular non-mechanical fault arising every time it rained. This was annoying as it was intended to be our “car for life”. We are totally thrilled with the one we’ve purchased and hopefully will be the last we one we need to buy.

As most of you know, the work in our home has now begun. All our downstairs furniture is in storage, the wallpaper stripped, carpets and curtains disposed of, radiators removed, and the Cotswold stone fireplace that ran across one wall in the lounge has been dismantled. Dave thoroughly enjoyed himself knocking it down to reveal the old chimney breast. We are now waiting on the plasterer coming in, which won’t be until the end of the month to do both rooms.

Meanwhile, we have no central heating downstairs and are having to slum it on garden chairs and electric fires for the time being. We can’t foresee the work being finished much before Christmas, as once the plastering is done, we have to wait a week or so for it to dry out before Dave can paint the walls, and fit and paint new skirting boards before the plumber can return to install new vertical radiators and refit the removed ones in various room around the house. After that, Dave can then lay the new wooden floor.

I’ve kept pretty much out of the way during all this because of the dust created, but Dave is exceptionally good in cleaning up each day as dust causes a health issue with me. We eat off our laps, which is something he doesn’t like doing so rescued a small wine table from storage to use. A dinner plate just about fits on it. Tempers haven’t frayed, noise hasn’t been too bad and we know it will all be well worth the disruption caused in the end.

And I never thought I would say this, but “Roll on Christmas!”

And So the Work Begins

Hope you’ve all had a lovely summer!

So, here we are in September – autumn – and sadly the high summer heat we enjoyed in the UK seems to have sunk to a more normal summer’s day temperature, which for me is a pity. As I’ve said often, I love the hot weather, but it has been far too hot for me to do any painting and the long-awaited redecoration of our lounge and dining room had to be put on hold. No way was I having Dave swinging a lump hammer about to dismantle our stone fire surround or crawling on his hands and knees laying new flooring in temperatures hitting the 30s, so we’ve enjoyed long lazy days in the garden instead.

A further delay incurred was finding a suitable plumber and gas fitter to do the necessary dismantling before we could start. We found plenty, given lots of recommendations but they either never even bothered to turn up when they said they would, others put up all sorts of problems to what is a very straightforward job – removing 2 radiators,  disconnecting an old gas fire and latterly installing a new shower (ours had jammed on cold. Lovely in the hot weather, not so now it’s cooler!) – and promised quotations were never sent. And it seems we are not alone in finding difficulty when wanting a plumber.

A chance conversation with a neighbour a few days ago brought up this very subject. She was cursing as a plumber she was expecting never showed so had been recommended another. I told her we were in the same predicament. Her new chap turned up on time a few days later and brought him round to see if he could help us. What a find! Nothing was too much trouble, no job too small or difficult and he would be with us to do the work a few days later. Promptly at 8:00am he arrived, said radiators and fire removed, new shower installed and a coffee drunk, and all before 10:00 am. And he’s happy to return when we are ready for the refit and changes.

So, here we are ready to box up our two rooms, and can now arrange the furniture storage and rubbish skip. We’ve already chosen our colour scheme, one wall has been used as a test piece for paint, the feature wall paper already purchased.

I’m not looking forward to the noise and the mess but needs must. Nor can I escape too far whilst it’s being done as I’ve sprained my foot but it gives me a good excuse to shut myself away upstairs next week and write, write, write, if I can cope with all the banging and crashing, that it. Wish me luck!

 

A Summer of Firsts

This summer has certainly been sweltering so far, and I love it. But it has its downside too, for keeping the garden thriving has been a major task. Thankfully we’re not on a water meter or a hosepipe ban so the new flower border is more colourful than ever.

But despite our best efforts our vegetables have been a failure – a first for Dave. The broad beans cropped well but of once shelled were all covered in black spots and consigned to the compost bin. We managed about three meals from the runner beans before they withered. Dave has cut them back in hope they’ll reshoot. The peas were a non-starter and the sweet peas although flowered had stems no longer than 2 inches and soon died in the heat. That said, the onions, carrots and potatoes are cropping, so at least we’re not starving. But therein came another first for us.

We kept finding the onions pulled out and scattered around the vegetable patch, we’re talking here about the whole matured, fully grown and ready to harvest bulbs. Then some of the dahlias were pulled out of the ground. A few mornings on we found tattered and chewed children’s soft toys discarded amongst the veg. Big holes were appearing in the ground, too big to be cats and we have no wild rabbits here. The culprits were seen one evening when I spied them coming into the garden through the adjoining hedge – foxes, a family of 7. Urban foxes have always been around but we’ve never had any damage. They’ve even dug large holes under a neighbours’ new fence.

But there have been some lovely firsts too. We haven’t seen many butterflies here this summer apart from the pesky cabbage whites. One appeared that I hadn’t seen before – a marbled white. Not as troublesome as the cabbage whites.

Marbled White Butterfly

The butterflies might be scare but there have been plenty of moths. One was  a privet hawk moth, with a wingspan of approx 4 inches, these moths are the largest in the UK. I haven’t seen them since moving away from London so a first for my garden. It was also unusual in that there are no privet hedges locally!

Privet Hawk Moth

Another morning I noticed a strange-looking black and white butterfly sitting on one of my flowers. A closer inspection showed it was a moth. I grabbed my camera and tried to take a photo. As I did, it opened its wings and took flight revealing the most beautiful orange wings as it fluttered over the fence into another garden. Research told me it was a tiger moth, and that the unknown hairy caterpillars I kept finding on a rose bush were in fact tiger moth caterpillars. More firsts. As always, I’m too slow with the camera so I’ve had to obtain these 3 ref photos.

Tiger Moth

Last Wednesday as Dave and I were enjoying a coffee on the patio, he noticed a very fat, long (at least 3 inches!) green caterpillar making its way across the slabs. It looked rather like those stuffed draft excluders we all had years ago to keep the wind from blowing under the doors. He took a photo and ran inside to look it up on the internet as neither of us recognized it. Whilst he was gone, I spied another happily munching away on a fuchsia bush. They turned out to be elephant hawk moth caterpillars – I never knew they also came in green, I’d only ever seen the brown ones. We found out that they start off green and over the course of a few days slowly turn brown.  Two days later, trundling along the patio heading for the undergrowth along came a brown one. At least they shuffle along slowly so I was able to capture them on camera. (As I’m writing this post, Dave has just come upstairs to show me another green one he’s found chomping on a plant!)

Another first is a sunflower growing in the new border. In all the 40 years I’ve been gardening here, I’ve never grown one. I’d popped a few sunflowers seeds from the birdfeed into the ground out of curiosity to see if they would grow. Two of them I must have pulled out when weeding but one has grown into a beauty, almost 6 feet tall with lots of buds coming out.

But the best first of all wasn’t a moth, butterfly or caterpillar or a flower. It was a pair of goldfinches settling on the birdfeeder to enjoy a feast of nyger seeds. I knew goldfinches were in the area, I’d seen and heard them about them since last winter, so I’d put out the nyger seeds in the hope they would come into the garden. They did, and a few days later two youngsters joined them. Now we often have 7 or 8 around the feeders. They take no notice of Dave or me or of the resident sparrows.

Talking of sparrows… Billy One Mate still pops into the garden for a feed on the ground but he’s now with a small flock of his fellow starlings. I know it’s him as he has a white flash down his chest. He’s thriving, bless him, after such a shaky start.

And with summer still not over, who knows what other firsts might appear.