Talk of The Town.

In 1989 we met our first miniature horse and fell in love. Of course we didn’t have a clue what we were doing and only intended to get a pet. Oh yeah, they are like potatoe chips. You can’t have just one. And for us we couldn’t just have a pet.

We joined the NW Miniature Horse club http://www.nwmhc.com/index.htm , one of the largest in the nation and The American Miniature Horse Assoc. And, started getting an education.

We bought Double BB’s Talk Of The Town (picture above) at a show in Sacramento when he was a year old. He was already named and I loved it. How he got it is a whole other story. When we retired the business we had intended to sell all of the horses and we even had Talker sold but I just couldn’t do it so he has become a much loved pet. And, he has a fan club. We live next to a park and people visit him over the fence bringing him apples and carrots. Talker knows who brings treats and he prances and preens for them.

American Miniature Horses were brought over from Europe to work in the mines and were called pit ponies. They were much stockier then today’s horses. Today’s stables strive for a certain type like a miniature Morgan, Arabian, Quarter Horse and color breeds like the Pinto, and Appaloosa. Foaling season is exciting and most stables have halter monitors and camera’s to alert them to when a mare is foaling. It didn’t take but a year or two of sleeping in the barn for us to have them installed so we could lie in bed and watch the foaling stalls.

To qualify for the AMHA Registry a horse has to be 34 inches or under measured from the last hair on the mane. We had a dog that was bigger than some of our mature horses and always bigger than the foals. Nicki loved the horses and some more than others. He’s pictured below with one of his favorites. At night when the horses would come in he would run and sit quietly in the corner of her stall hoping he wouldn’t be noticed and we would shut him with her.

The years we had the horses were fun. We met wonderful people that will forever be friends. We still frequent horse shows. Take a look in your area, there might be one close. A great way to spend the day.

The history of this unique little horse can be found at http://www.theminiaturehorse.com/historyminiatures.htm

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6 responses to “Talk of The Town.

  1. Wow awesome. I learned something today- didn’t know about the working of the pits. What a beautiful horse. Thanks for posting this- very cool!

  2. Ahhhh, Talker is adorable! And I loved learning more about miniature horse. But most of all, I love the following Talker has. Way cool!

  3. Jillian, we were surprised at the history behind these little horses. They have personalities much like arabians. It they get the opportunity they’ll follow you right in the house. We had one that loved to come in and get a carrot from the fridge.

    Laurie, thanks Talker agree’s that he’s adorable and lets everyone he can know it.

  4. Valerie J. Patterson

    What a cute horse! There is a horse farm I used to drive past every day on my way to the office. They had only one miniature, but I would wave to it every morning as I passed him. When I got transferred, I stopped passing by the horse farm and one day, my little pony was gone. I, of course, have no idea what happened to him, but I like to think he got transferred, too, and that nothing happened to him!

  5. Lavada! I didn’t know you hadmininature horses!!

    JH!

  6. Valerie, something like that happened here a few weeks ago. Talker ate to much early grass and got a tummy ache. The vet was called and gave him some meds and restricted him to stall rest. The next night there some people hanging over the fence down by the barn. They were thinking the worse because he’d been looking unwell. I told Jack he needed to go down and give them a report before we found a memorial set up for him.

    Janette, We use to raise and show them. In the spring we had some of the cutest little pasture critters. The first show of the season is in Elma. It used to be in Tumwater.

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